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Solar Eclipse: August 21, 2017

10 May 2017 5:04 PM | Marutt (Administrator)

This summer, camps have the opportunity to provide campers with a unique and memorable experience.  While BC is outside of  the path of total eclipse, observers in southern BC will be able to witness an eclipse with 85% coverage. The eclipse can be viewed from Vancouver between 09:10 am and 11:37 with the maximum eclipse occurring at 10:21 am.

Eclipse Safety

  • The only safe way to look directly at the partially eclipsed Sun is through special-purpose solar filters or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses are not safe for looking at the Sun.  
  • Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter. 
  • Always supervise children using solar filters.
  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright Sun. After glancing at the Sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the Sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the Sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. 

Solar Viewers 

The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada has solar viewers available to purchase on their website for $2 each if you buy 26 or more.

You can order solar viewers from their website here



Other Celestial Events for summer 2017

July 29, 30 - Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower
  • Up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak
  • Produced by debris left behind by Marsden and Kracht comets
  • Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight
  • Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius

August 11,12 - Perseids Meteor Shower
  • Up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak
  • Produced by comet Swift-Tuttle (discovered in 1862)
  • Waning gibbous moon will block out many of the fainter meteors this year
  • Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight
  • Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus

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